English Phrasal Verbs – out part 7

If you ‘fall out’ with somebody, you have a bad argument with them.

  • They fell out over the arrangements for the meeting.
  • I don’t want to fall out with you but I’m very unhappy with what you have done.

If news ‘leaks out’, people who shouldn’t know about it do.

  • Details of the report leaked out over the weekend.
  • If this information leaks out, we are in serious trouble.

If you ‘come out with’ something, you say something suddenly.

  • She came straight out with it and said I was a liar.
  • You never know what he is going to come out with next.

If you ‘come out with’ a new product , you make available something new.

  • Microsoft have come out with a new version of Office.
  • We haven’t come out with a new product for two years.

If you ‘give out’ information,  you hand it out to people.

  • I’ll give out a summary at the end so you don’t need to take notes.
  • Could you give those papers out for me, please?

If something ‘gives out’, it stops working or supplies run out.

  • Our stock of leather will give out in three days, if we don’t get any more.
    My voice is about to give out so I’ll stop my presentation at this point.

If you are ‘let out’ of something, it can mean that you escape from doing something difficult or unpleasant or that you have agreed to do.

  • They won’t let us out of our contract with them.
  • He resigned this morning which lets me out from having to fire him.

If you ‘make something out’, it can mean that you are able to see or hear something with difficulty.

  • I couldn’t make out what he was saying with all that background noise.
  • I can’t make out who sent me this letter.

To ‘make out something’ can mean to claim falsely that something is true.

  • He made out that he had a lot of experience in this area but it wasn’t true.
  • He’s not as difficult a person as he is often made out to be.

If you are ‘put out’, it can mean that you are annoyed or caused extra work by something that is said or done.

  • He seemed put out that we didn’t ask him to join us for lunch.
  • I don’t want to put you out. Don’t do it if it is too much bother.

exercise 1
exercise 2
exercise 3
exercise 4

4 thoughts on “English Phrasal Verbs – out part 7”

  1. I just want to thank you for your free English lessons. They’re so helpfull and practical to any learner of English whatever the level. Please, keep on helping us.

  2. Lovely accent! Good job in putting this all together!

    I’d love to do the same for basic learners in my country!

    indly,
    Barbara Muniz

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