Expressions used with contract

Learn the vocabulary in English to talk about job contracts:

‘binding contract’ is one which cannot be legally avoided or stopped.

  • We have a legally binding contract and you must supply us with these services. 
  • You can’t walk out on your binding contract just because you have received a better offer elsewhere.

An ‘exclusive contract’ is one which prevents the person from working with other people.

  • You have an exclusive contract to work with us and you cannot take on work for anybody else.
  • I think we should offer her an exclusive contract so that she only works for us.

‘renewable contract’ is one which can be continued after it has finished by a new one. The opposite of this is a ‘non-renewable contract’.

  • To work on this project, we can offer you a non-renewable contract of one year.
  • The contract is for one year, renewable for a second year if we are satisfied with your work.

‘temporary contract’ is one that is not permanent.

  • We can give you a temporary contract for six months.
  • You’ll start on a temporary contract and we may then offer you a permanent one.

‘valid contract’ is one that has legal force.

  • This contract is not valid until it is signed by both parties.
  • This letter is not a valid contract. I want a proper one.

‘breach of contract’ is when the person does something which breaks the terms of the contract.

  • If you don’t agree to move to Paris, you will be in breach of your contract.
  • If you refuse to work on Sunday, that is a breach of contract and we will dismiss you.

The ‘terms of contract’ are the conditions contained within the contract.

  • Under the terms of your contract, you have to work on some Sundays.
  • You are asking me to do something which is not in the terms of my contract.

If you ‘draw up’ a contract, you prepare it.

  • I’ll draw up a contract for you and you can sign it tomorrow.
  • I’ll get a new contract drawn up including the new terms and conditions.

If you ‘get out of’ a contract, you are no longer bound by it.

  • I’m not happy in my job and need to find a way to get out of my contract.
  • I think she’s being difficult because she wants to get out of her contract with us.

If you ‘go through’ a contract, you look at it in detail.

  • We need to spend a few minutes going through your contract.
  • Make sure you go through your contract carefully before you sign it.

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19 thoughts on “Expressions used with contract”

  1. Thank you Mr. Pearson for you passion and love for the English language. I appreciate the weekly lessons you send which are helping to improve my teaching skills and impacting the lives of my learners immensely. Do reply with the name of any bookshop in London where any of your publications can be purchased. Keep up the great work.

  2. hello there
    i am so grateful for these interesting lessons and these useful practices
    i look forward to send me some letters of motivation, or cover letters, to try the French or British Universities
    THANK YOU

  3. Hi,

    today i had learned about the contracts and is very important for me, because my job i work at human resources.

    I hope learn much more about English languaje 🙂
    Blessings 🙂

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    May God continue keeping and blessing you all in Jesus name.

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