Three Word Verbs

‘Come in for’ means to receive. This is usually used with words such as ‘criticism’ ‘abuse’ ‘blame’.

  • He came in for a lot of criticism for his actions.
  • She came in for a lot of abuse when she tried to argue with them

‘Go in for’ can be used with words such as ‘competition’ to mean ‘enter’.

  • I went in for a Scrabble tournament at my club and I won.
  • She was a good athlete when she was younger and went in for the trials for the Olympic team

‘Sit in on’ can be used with words such as ‘conference’ or ‘meeting’ to indicate that you attend as an observer and not as a regular participant.

  • I’ve asked John to sit in on this meeting as he knows more about these people than we do.
  • I’d like you to sit in on the negotiations with the unions as part of your training

‘Stand in for’ is used to mean ‘substitute for’.

  • Harry is ill so I’m going to stand in for him and make the presentation.
  • Wendy is on vacation and I’m standing in for her

If you ‘go along with’ existing plans, opinions or decisions you accept them and don’t try to change them.

  • I go along with your ideas about increasing our marketing in China.
  • You agreed to go along with our decision

If you ‘listen out for’ something, you keep alert and make an effort to hear it.

  • I’m expecting him to call so listen out for the phone ringing.
  • Listen out for their car. They should be here soon

If you ‘cash in on’ a situation, you take advantage of it, often unfairly.

  • He cashed in on my absence with flu to contact my customers directly.
  • We need to cash in on the emerging markets in Asia

If you ‘drop in on’ somebody, you make an informal, unarranged visit to see them.

  • I dropped in on Martin when I was visiting Sidcup.
  • Drop in on me any time you are in town.

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